README: add more `code` formatting
authorBrian Norris <banorris@uci.edu>
Tue, 4 Jun 2013 23:04:56 +0000 (16:04 -0700)
committerBrian Norris <banorris@uci.edu>
Tue, 4 Jun 2013 23:04:56 +0000 (16:04 -0700)
README.md

index 37eb962..218e960 100644 (file)
--- a/README.md
+++ b/README.md
@@ -146,7 +146,7 @@ variable, for instance.
 Reading an execution trace
 --------------------------
 
 Reading an execution trace
 --------------------------
 
-When CDSChecker detects a bug in your program (or when run with the --verbose
+When CDSChecker detects a bug in your program (or when run with the `--verbose`
 flag), it prints the output of the program run (STDOUT) along with some summary
 trace information for the execution in question. The trace is given as a
 sequence of lines, where each line represents an operation in the execution
 flag), it prints the output of the program run (STDOUT) along with some summary
 trace information for the execution in question. The trace is given as a
 sequence of lines, where each line represents an operation in the execution
@@ -180,7 +180,7 @@ The following list describes each of the columns in the execution trace output:
 
  * Rf: For reads, the sequence number of the operation from which it reads.
    [Note: If the execution is a partial, infeasible trace (labeled INFEASIBLE),
 
  * Rf: For reads, the sequence number of the operation from which it reads.
    [Note: If the execution is a partial, infeasible trace (labeled INFEASIBLE),
-   as printed during --verbose execution, reads may not be resolved and so may
+   as printed during `--verbose` execution, reads may not be resolved and so may
    have Rf=? or Rf=Px, where x is a promised future value.]
 
  * CV: The clock vector, encapsulating the happens-before relation (see our
    have Rf=? or Rf=Px, where x is a promised future value.]
 
  * CV: The clock vector, encapsulating the happens-before relation (see our
@@ -226,7 +226,7 @@ HASH 4073708854
 Now consider, for example, operation 10:
 
 This is the 10th operation in the execution order. It is an atomic read-relaxed
 Now consider, for example, operation 10:
 
 This is the 10th operation in the execution order. It is an atomic read-relaxed
-operation performed by thread 3 at memory address 0x601068. It reads the value
+operation performed by thread 3 at memory address `0x601068`. It reads the value
 "0", which was written by the 2nd operation in the execution order. Its clock
 vector consists of the following values:
 
 "0", which was written by the 2nd operation in the execution order. Its clock
 vector consists of the following values: