Added information on the GCC front end.
[oota-llvm.git] / docs / FAQ.html
index 6b60272..e44defb 100644 (file)
-<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN">
+<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"
+                      "http://www.w3.org/TR/html4/strict.dtd">
+<html>
+<head>
+  <title>LLVM: Frequently Asked Questions</title>
+  <style>
+    @import url("llvm.css");
+    .question { font-weight: bold }
+    .answer   { margin-left: 2em  }
+  </style>
+</head>
+<body>
 
-<h1>
-<center>
-LLVM: Frequently Asked Questions
-</center>
-</h1>
+<div class="doc_title">
+  LLVM: Frequently Asked Questions
+</div>
 
-<hr>
+<ol>
+  <li><a href="#license">License</a>
+  <ol>
+  <li>Why are the LLVM source code and the front-end distributed under different
+  licenses?</li>
+  <li>Does the University of Illinois Open Source License really qualify as an
+  "open source" license?</li>
+  <li>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute the modified source?</li>
+  <li>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute binaries or other tools
+  based on it, without redistributing the source?</li>
+  </ol></li>
 
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-<h2>
-<a name="license">Licenses</a>
-</h2>
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-
-<dl compact>
-       <dt> <b>Why are the LLVM source code and the front-end distributed
-       under different licenses?</b>
-       <dd>
-       The C/C++ front-ends are based on GCC and must be distributed under
-       the GPL.  Our aim is to distribute LLVM source code are a <em>much
-       less restrictive</em> license, in particular one that does not
-       compel users who distribute tools based on modifying the source to
-       redistribute the modified source code as well.
-
-       <dt><b>Does the Illinois Open Source License really qualify 
-         as an "open source" license?</b>
-       <dd>The 
-       <a href="http://www.opensource.org/licenses/UoI-NCSA.php">
-        UI Open Source License</a> is certified by the
-       Open Source Initiative (OSI).
-
-       <dt> <b>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute the modified
-         source?</b>
-       <dd>
-       Yes.  The modified source distribution must retain notice both the
-       copyright notice and follow the three bulletted conditions listed in
-       the <a href="releases/1.0/LICENSE.txt">LLVM license</a>.
-
-       <dt> <b>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute binaries or
-         other tools based on it, without redistributing the source.
-       <dd>
-       Yes, this is why we distribute LLVM under a less restrictive license
-       than GPL, as explained in the first question above.
-       <p>
-</dl>
-<hr>
+  <li><a href="#source">Source code</a>
+  <ol>
+  <li>In what language is LLVM written?</li>
+  <li>How portable is the LLVM source code?</li>
+  </ol></li>
 
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-<h2>
-<a name="source">Source Code</a>
-</h2>
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-
-<dl compact>
-       <dt> <b>In what language is LLVM written?</b>
-       <dd>
-       All of the LLVM tools and libraries are written in C++ with extensive use
-       of the STL.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>How portable is the LLVM source code?</b>
-       <dd>
-       The LLVM source code should be portable to most modern UNIX-like operating
-       systems.  Most of the code is written in standard C++ with operating
-       system services abstracted to a support library.  The tools required to
-       build and test LLVM have been ported to a plethora of platforms.
-       <p>
-       Some porting problems may exist in the following areas:
-       <ul>
-               <li>The GCC front end code is not as portable as the LLVM suite, so it
-               may not compile as well on unsupported platforms.
-
-               <p>
-
-               <li>The Python test classes are more UNIX-centric than they should be,
-               so porting to non-UNIX like platforms (i.e. Windows, MacOS 9) will
-               require some effort.
-               <p>
-
-               <li>The LLVM build system relies heavily on UNIX shell tools, like the
-               Bourne Shell and sed.  Porting to systems without these tools (MacOS 9,
-               Plan 9) will require more effort.
-       </ul>
-</dl>
+  <li><a href="#build">Build Problems</a>
+  <ol>
+  <li>When I run configure, it finds the wrong C compiler.</li>
+  <li>I compile the code, and I get some error about <tt>/localhome</tt>.</li>
+  <li>The <tt>configure</tt> script finds the right C compiler, but it uses the
+  LLVM linker from a previous build.  What do I do?</li>
+  <li>When creating a dynamic library, I get a strange GLIBC error.</li>
+  <li>I've updated my source tree from CVS, and now my build is trying to use a
+  file/directory that doesn't exist.</li>
+  <li>I've modified a Makefile in my source tree, but my build tree keeps using
+  the old version.  What do I do?</li>
+  <li>I've upgraded to a new version of LLVM, and I get strange build
+  errors.</li>
+  <li>I've built LLVM and am testing it, but the tests freeze.</li>
+  <li>Why do test results differ when I perform different types of builds?</li>
+  </ol></li>
+</ol>
 
-<hr>
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+<div class="doc_section">
+  <a name="license">License</a>
+</div>
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
 
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-<h2>
-<a name="build">Build Problems</a>
-</h2>
-<!--=====================================================================-->
-
-<dl compact>
-       <dt><b>When I run configure, it finds the wrong C compiler.</b>
-       <dd>
-       The <tt>configure</tt> script attempts to locate first <tt>gcc</tt> and
-       then <tt>cc</tt>, unless it finds compiler paths set in <tt>CC</tt> and
-       <tt>CXX</tt> for the C and C++ compiler, respectively.
-
-       If <tt>configure</tt> finds the wrong compiler, either adjust your
-       <tt>PATH</tt> environment variable or set <tt>CC</tt> and <tt>CXX</tt>
-       explicitly.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>I compile the code, and I get some error about /localhome</b>.
-       <dd>
-       There are several possible causes for this.  The first is that you
-       didn't set a pathname properly when using <tt>configure</tt>, and it
-       defaulted to a pathname that we use on our research machines.
-       <p>
-       Another possibility is that we hardcoded a path in our Makefiles.  If
-       you see this, please email the LLVM bug mailing list with the name of
-       the offending Makefile and a description of what is wrong with it.
-
-       <dt><b>The <tt>configure</tt> script finds the right C compiler, but it
-       uses the LLVM linker from a previous build.  What do I do?</b>
-       <dd>
-       The <tt>configure</tt> script uses the <tt>PATH</tt> to find
-       executables, so if it's grabbing the wrong linker/assembler/etc, there
-       are two ways to fix it:
-       <ol>
-               <li>Adjust your <tt>PATH</tt> environment variable so that the
-               correct program appears first in the <tt>PATH</tt>.  This may work,
-               but may not be convenient when you want them <i>first</i> in your
-               path for other work.
-               <p>
-
-               <li>Run <tt>configure</tt> with an alternative <tt>PATH</tt> that
-               is correct.  In a Borne compatible shell, the syntax would be:
-               <p>
-               <tt>PATH=<the path without the bad program> ./configure ...</tt>
-               <p>
-               This is still somewhat inconvenient, but it allows
-               <tt>configure</tt> to do its work without having to adjust your
-               <tt>PATH</tt> permanently.
-       </ol>
-
-       <dt><b>When creating a dynamic library, I get a strange GLIBC error.</b>
-       <dd>
-       Under some operating systems (i.e. Linux), libtool does not work correctly
-       if GCC was compiled with the --disable-shared option.  To work around this,
-       install your own version of GCC that has shared libraries enabled by
-       default.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>I've updated my source tree from CVS, and now my build is trying to
-       use a file/directory that doesn't exist.</b>
-       <dd>
-       You need to re-run configure in your object directory.  When new Makefiles
-       are added to the source tree, they have to be copied over to the object
-       tree in order to be used by the build.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>I've modified a Makefile in my source tree, but my build tree keeps
-       using the old version.  What do I do?</b>
-       <dd>
-       If the Makefile already exists in your object tree, you can just run the
-       following command in the top level directory of your object tree:
-       <p>
-       <tt>./config.status &lt;relative path to Makefile&gt;</tt>
-       <p>
-       If the Makefile is new, you will have to modify the configure script to copy
-       it over.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>I've upgraded to a new version of LLVM, and I get strange build
-       errors.</b>
-       <dd>
-       Sometimes changes to the LLVM source code alters how the build system
-       works.  Changes in libtool, autoconf, or header file dependencies are
-       especially prone to this sort of problem.
-       <p>
-       The best thing to try is to remove the old files and re-build.  In most
-       cases, this takes care of the problem.  To do this, just type <tt>make
-       clean</tt> and then <tt>make</tt> in the directory that fails to build.
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>I've built LLVM and am testing it, but the tests freeze.</b>
-       <dd>
-       This is most likely occurring because you built a profile or release
-       (optimized) build of LLVM and have not specified the same information on
-       the <tt>gmake</tt> command line.
-       <p>
-       For example, if you built LLVM with the command:
-       <p>
-       <tt>gmake ENABLE_PROFILING=1</tt>
-       <p>
-       ...then you must run the tests with the following commands:
-       <p>
-       <tt>cd llvm/test<br>gmake  ENABLE_PROFILING=1</tt>
-       <p>
-
-       <dt><b>Why do test results differ when I perform different types of
-       builds?</b>
-       <dd>
-       The LLVM test suite is dependent upon several features of the LLVM tools
-       and libraries.
-       <p>
-       First, the debugging assertions in code are not enabled in optimized or
-       profiling builds.  Hence, tests that used to fail may pass.
-       <p>
-       Second, some tests may rely upon debugging options or behavior that is
-       only available in the debug build.  These tests will fail in an optimized
-       or profile build.
-</dl>
-<hr>
+<div class="question">
+<p>Why are the LLVM source code and the front-end distributed under different
+licenses?</p>
+</div>
+       
+<div class="answer">
+<p>The C/C++ front-ends are based on GCC and must be distributed under the GPL.
+Our aim is to distribute LLVM source code under a <em>much less restrictive</em>
+license, in particular one that does not compel users who distribute tools based
+on modifying the source to redistribute the modified source code as well.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>Does the University of Illinois Open Source License really qualify as an
+"open source" license?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>Yes, the license is <a
+href="http://www.opensource.org/licenses/UoI-NCSA.php">certified</a> by the Open
+Source Initiative (OSI).</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute the modified source?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>Yes.  The modified source distribution must retain the copyright notice and
+follow the three bulletted conditions listed in the <a
+href="http://llvm.cs.uiuc.edu/releases/1.0/LICENSE.TXT">LLVM license</a>.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>Can I modify LLVM source code and redistribute binaries or other tools based
+on it, without redistributing the source?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>Yes, this is why we distribute LLVM under a less restrictive license than
+GPL, as explained in the first question above.</p>
+</div>
+
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+<div class="doc_section">
+  <a name="source">Source Code</a>
+</div>
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>In what language is LLVM written?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>All of the LLVM tools and libraries are written in C++ with extensive use of
+the STL.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>How portable is the LLVM source code?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>The LLVM source code should be portable to most modern UNIX-like operating
+systems.  Most of the code is written in standard C++ with operating system
+services abstracted to a support library.  The tools required to build and test
+LLVM have been ported to a plethora of platforms.</p>
+
+<p>Some porting problems may exist in the following areas:</p>
+
+<ul>
+
+  <li>The GCC front end code is not as portable as the LLVM suite, so it may not
+  compile as well on unsupported platforms.</li>
+
+  <li>The Python test classes are more UNIX-centric than they should be, so
+  porting to non-UNIX like platforms (i.e. Windows, MacOS 9) will require some
+  effort.</li>
+
+  <li>The LLVM build system relies heavily on UNIX shell tools, like the Bourne
+  Shell and sed.  Porting to systems without these tools (MacOS 9, Plan 9) will
+  require more effort.</li>
+
+</ul>
+
+</div>
+
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+<div class="doc_section">
+  <a name="build">Build Problems</a>
+</div>
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>When I run configure, it finds the wrong C compiler.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>The <tt>configure</tt> script attempts to locate first <tt>gcc</tt> and then
+<tt>cc</tt>, unless it finds compiler paths set in <tt>CC</tt> and <tt>CXX</tt>
+for the C and C++ compiler, respectively.</p>
+
+<p>If <tt>configure</tt> finds the wrong compiler, either adjust your
+<tt>PATH</tt> environment variable or set <tt>CC</tt> and <tt>CXX</tt>
+explicitly.</p>
+
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>I compile the code, and I get some error about <tt>/localhome</tt>.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>There are several possible causes for this.  The first is that you didn't set
+a pathname properly when using <tt>configure</tt>, and it defaulted to a
+pathname that we use on our research machines.</p>
+
+<p>Another possibility is that we hardcoded a path in our Makefiles.  If you see
+this, please email the LLVM bug mailing list with the name of the offending
+Makefile and a description of what is wrong with it.</p>
+
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>The <tt>configure</tt> script finds the right C compiler, but it uses the
+LLVM linker from a previous build.  What do I do?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>The <tt>configure</tt> script uses the <tt>PATH</tt> to find executables, so
+if it's grabbing the wrong linker/assembler/etc, there are two ways to fix
+it:</p>
+
+<ol>
+               
+  <li><p>Adjust your <tt>PATH</tt> environment variable so that the correct
+  program appears first in the <tt>PATH</tt>.  This may work, but may not be
+  convenient when you want them <i>first</i> in your path for other
+  work.</p></li>
+
+  <li><p>Run <tt>configure</tt> with an alternative <tt>PATH</tt> that is
+  correct. In a Borne compatible shell, the syntax would be:</p>
+               
+      <p><tt>PATH=<the path without the bad program> ./configure ...</tt></p>
+
+      <p>This is still somewhat inconvenient, but it allows <tt>configure</tt>
+      to do its work without having to adjust your <tt>PATH</tt>
+      permanently.</p></li>
+       
+</ol>
+
+</div>
 
-<a href="http://llvm.cs.uiuc.edu">The LLVM Compiler Infrastructure</a>
-<br>
+<div class="question">
+<p>When creating a dynamic library, I get a strange GLIBC error.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>Under some operating systems (i.e. Linux), libtool does not work correctly if
+GCC was compiled with the --disable-shared option.  To work around this, install
+your own version of GCC that has shared libraries enabled by default.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>I've updated my source tree from CVS, and now my build is trying to use a
+file/directory that doesn't exist.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>You need to re-run configure in your object directory.  When new Makefiles
+are added to the source tree, they have to be copied over to the object tree in
+order to be used by the build.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>I've modified a Makefile in my source tree, but my build tree keeps using the
+old version.  What do I do?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>If the Makefile already exists in your object tree, you
+can just run the following command in the top level directory of your object
+tree:</p>
+
+<p><tt>./config.status &lt;relative path to Makefile&gt;</tt><p>
+
+<p>If the Makefile is new, you will have to modify the configure script to copy
+it over.</p>
+
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>I've upgraded to a new version of LLVM, and I get strange build errors.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>Sometimes, changes to the LLVM source code alters how the build system works.
+Changes in libtool, autoconf, or header file dependencies are especially prone
+to this sort of problem.</p>
+
+<p>The best thing to try is to remove the old files and re-build.  In most
+cases, this takes care of the problem.  To do this, just type <tt>make
+clean</tt> and then <tt>make</tt> in the directory that fails to build.</p>
+
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>I've built LLVM and am testing it, but the tests freeze.</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>This is most likely occurring because you built a profile or release
+(optimized) build of LLVM and have not specified the same information on the
+<tt>gmake</tt> command line.</p>
+
+<p>For example, if you built LLVM with the command:</p>
+
+<p><tt>gmake ENABLE_PROFILING=1</tt>
+
+<p>...then you must run the tests with the following commands:</p>
+
+<p><tt>cd llvm/test<br>gmake  ENABLE_PROFILING=1</tt></p>
+
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>Why do test results differ when I perform different types of builds?</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+
+<p>The LLVM test suite is dependent upon several features of the LLVM tools and
+libraries.</p>
+
+<p>First, the debugging assertions in code are not enabled in optimized or
+profiling builds.  Hence, tests that used to fail may pass.</p>
+       
+<p>Second, some tests may rely upon debugging options or behavior that is only
+available in the debug build.  These tests will fail in an optimized or profile
+build.</p>
+
+</div>
+
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+<div class="doc_section">
+  <a name="cfe">GCC Front End</a>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question">
+<p>
+When I compile software that uses a configure script, the configure script
+thinks my system has all of the header files and libraries it is testing for.
+How do I get configure to work correctly?
+</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer">
+<p>
+The configure script is getting things wrong because the LLVM linker allows
+symbols to be undefined at link time (so that they can be resolved during JIT
+or translation to the C back end).  That is why configure thinks your system
+"has everything."
+</p>
+<p>
+To work around this, perform the following steps:
+</p>
+
+<ol>
+  <li>
+  Make sure the CC and CXX environment variables contains the full path to the
+  LLVM GCC front end.
+  </li>
+
+  <li>
+  Make sure that the regular C compiler is first in your PATH.
+  </li>
+
+  <li>
+  Add the string "-Wl,-native" to your CFLAGS environment variable.
+  </li>
+</ol>
+
+<p>
+This will allow the gccld linker to create a native code executable instead of
+a shell script that runs the JIT.  Creating native code requires standard
+linkage, which in turn will allow the configure script to find out if code is
+not linking on your system because the feature isn't available on your system.
+</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="question"
+<p>
+When I compile code using the LLVM GCC front end, it complains that it cannot
+find crtend.o.
+</p>
+</div>
+
+<div class="answer"
+<p>
+In order to find crtend.o, you must have the directory in which it lives in
+your LLVM_LIB_SEARCH_PATH environment variable.  For the binary distribution of
+the LLVM GCC front end, this will be the full path of the bytecode-libs
+directory inside of the LLVM GCC distribution.
+</p>
+</div>
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+<!-- *********************************************************************** -->
+
+<hr>
+<div class="doc_footer">
+  <a href="http://llvm.cs.uiuc.edu">The LLVM Compiler Infrastructure</a>
+  <br>
+  Last modified: $Date$
+</div>
 
 </body>
 </html>